Spray Foam Installation

 

 

Spray Foam Installation Spray Foam Insulation Advice UK

Spray foam is often installed incorrectly, leaving gaps or holes, which reduces its performance. Another issue is that SPF is not necessarily breathable, so inadequate ventilation can mean moisture is trapped and condensation forms between the insulation and external walls/roof, causing damp.

Spray polyurethane foam (SPF) is often applied to a sloping roof in poor condition, as a quick fix, or as a quick alternative method of improving insulation. It appears to be becoming increasingly popular, and unfortunately it may become more prevalent with the Government’s Green Homes Grant, supplying up to £5,000 of vouchers towards insulation improvements. Whilst contractors may push the benefits of spray foam, lenders will often insist that surveyors take a different view. Surveyors and valuers will often have to discount the value a property or request a specialist report, because it has SPF insulation. It may even make a property unmortgageable in the eyes of a lender.

SPF is more expensive than traditional types of insulation. It is applied as a liquid foam that is lightweight and hardens in situ. It is normally sprayed on to the underside of the roof approximately 100mm in thickness and the installation may emit lingering toxic fumes. SPF is unsightly and cannot be decorated over. It does have the advantage that, as spray foam insulation it is a better insulator than mineral wool (100mm of spray foam insulation is equivalent to around 170mm of traditional loft insulation). A thinner layer of SPF is required to get the same insulating effect. As it is applied to the roof slope, it also facilitates the installation of floorboarding in the loft.